Program

Asia
China
India
Indonesia
Japan
Korea
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Exhibitions

1 August - 31 December
Photo exhibition “The North Koreans. Glimpses of daily life in the DPRK”

The photos in this exhibition do not show parades and mass events of official DPRK propaganda. “The North Koreans” shows how people in the DPRK live their daily lives against the backdrop of totalitarian ideology – lives of a bizarre otherworldliness within the 21st century.

 

This selection of photographs - made by people who visited the DPRK several times; one of the photographers even lived there for several years - not only has a documentary value; the lines and colours of architecture, landscape and the calligraphy of the ubiquitous slogans and announcements are often strangely aesthetic.

 

Though the definition "forbidden photographs" is an elastic concept we can with certainty state that the photographs in this exhibition are not approved by the North Korean authorities. The book "The North Koreans" contains c. 320 photographs, of which 30 are exhibited.
 
Please note that the language of this exhibtion is in Dutch. The accompanying book is in English.

11 September - 21 December
Dressing the “Stans”. Textiles, dress and jewellery from Central Asia

As part of the 2017 Asia Year celebrations in Leiden, the Textile Research Centre, Hogewoerd 164, Leiden, is presenting a fascinating and colourful exhibition about textiles, dress and jewellery from Central Asia: the so-called ‘Stans’ (‘Land of…’), namely Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.

The exhibition will include traditional textiles, garments and accessories for men, women and children, from all parts of this vast and relatively unknown part of the world. On display there will be many items including ikats, velvets and embroideries from the ‘Stans’ in general. But there will also be more specific items, such as Afghan chapans (the type of coat made famous by ex-President Hamid Karzai, and which he wore during his visit to Leiden in 2008), buzkashi apparel (used in the "goat-grabbing" game of Central Asia) , as well as hunting hoods and cloths, used to 'hide' the hunter. From Uzbekistan there will be examples of the famous suzani embroideries and ikat dresses and coats, while the Turkmen will be represented by a range of traditional and silver jewellery and garments for women.

The exhibition will be open to the general public from 11th September until 22nd December 2017.

For more information about the exhibition and the Textiles Research centre, see www.trc-leiden.nl.

 

The illustration shows a hunting cloth from Nuristan, in modern Afghanistan, used to disguise the hunter. The cloth dates to the mid-20th century. TRC 2016.1773.

13 September - 14 January
Gallery Exhibition: Mapping Asia

The Museum of Anthropology (Museum Volkenkunde) organizes a special card exhibition this fall. The reason is that Leiden University, the City of Leiden and all its partners are celebrating Leiden Asia Year. About 30 objects, maps and objects on which Asian countries are depicted illustrate that cards are much more than you would think at first sight.

 

Cards are not objective. We assume that they only show how an area looks. But what you see is the vision of man behind it, the creator and the client. They have portrayed how to think about a particular area: what is to be found and who is the boss for example.

 

Read more about this special exhibition on the website of the Museum. 

14 September - 14 January
Urban Jungle – Megacities in Asia

The majority of the world’s fastest growing cities are located in Asia. Home to more than 10 million people, they are today’s megacities. The riveting images of Dutch photographer Martin Roemers, and additional photographs from the nineteenth and twentieth century, represent some of Asia’s busiest urban centers: Guangzhou, Jakarta, Karachi, Mumbai and Tokyo.

 

Picture by: Martin Roemers 

 

16 September - 26 November
Mapping Japan

This autumn Japan Museum SieboldHuis will present highlights from the Leiden University Library Collection in the exhibition ‘Mapping Japan’. With its travel logs, illustrated atlases, colourful maps, travel routes, etches and a host of other historic documents, this exhibition will take you on a journey to the Japan of the 18th and 19th centuries.

 

 

For more information visit the website of Japan Museum SieboldHuis

16 September - 26 November
Modern Japanese Lacquerware

Japan Museum SieboldHuis is pleased to present the exhibition: ‘Modern Japanese Lacquerware’. From 16 September to 26 November eleven renowned Japanese artists will display a selection of their works depicting the adaptation of this classic lacquerware technique to contemporary art.

 

These artists are established names in the Japanese art world and their works reflect the lacquerware culture in Japan today. Many are eminent lecturers at Japanese art academies dedicated to training the next generation of artists who will determine the future of urushi.

 

For more information on this special exhibition we invite you to visit the website of Japan Museum SieboldHuis. 

 

Lacquerware on the picture:
Murata, Kōken
Titel: Spirit of life (命の煌めき)

21 October - 28 May
Exhibition: Mentawai from indonesia

Thanks to the recent donation of Mentawai specialist and ancient professor of anthropology from Indonesia to Leiden University, Reimar Schefold, Museum of Anthropology has a special collection of Mentawaiers art and utensils in Indonesia to offer. A great opportunity to focus on these world-inhabitants during the Leiden Asia Year and during the Europalia Indonesia Arts festival in Leiden. On the basis of unique objects and stories, visitors will learn about ancient traditions and contemporary culture.

29 October - 12 January
Exhibition: Full of Character

For over 150 years, Leiden has been doing and carrying out research on Chinese languages and cultures. There is only a few places, with the exception of China, where there I as much knowledge and expertise available as in Leiden. In the context of the Leiden Asia Year, The Leiden Language Museum (Het Taalmuseum) has put its efforts to making this knowledge visible for the crowd.
 
Het Taalmuseum asked researcher Jeroen Wiedenhof to select a few items that show how China and Leiden handle the Chinese Language. The result is a photo exhibition with unique objects and everyday objects from Wiedenhofs own collection and from the Leiden streetscape.
 
The festive opening of the exhibition will take place during the China Theme Day: Fables and facts about Chinese language and writing at the Taalmuseum.
 
For more information we kindly ask you to visit the website of the Taalmuseum.

 

Picture by: Pim Top. "Sportshirt" brought from Peking by dr. Jeroen Wiedenhof.

1 November - 31 December
Exhibition: Kumikai group| Sumi-e

Kumikai is the name of a group of practitioners of sumi-e. The name means "company around Kumi" and was chosen in memory of her Japanese teacher Kumi Kuwamura. Sumi-e is a relatively unknown painting technique that originates in China, but is further refined in Japan. Sumi-e is the Japanese word for "ink image". Its basis lies in Zen Buddhism. The first practitioners of sumi-e were monks who devoted themselves to a strict schedule of meditation in preparation for painting. This was at the root of the creative process, which further consists of rubbing the ink, brushing the brush and releasing the brush stroke on the rice paper. The rice paper allows the ink to flow smoothly and improvement of the line is impossible. The drawing is completed by placing one or more stamps. The characters in these stamps are the name and thus the signature of the artist.

 

You are very welcome to visit this expo during openinghours.
 

3 November - 31 December
Exhibition: A Wink to Asia

For this exhibition, students of Sculpture and Ceramics have made a selection of their works of the last two years, with a wink to Asia. Our students from the Masterclass Painting Voorschoten have started with Asia as a starting point. Also the teachers have chosen their own works to be on discplay that are related to the subject. Therefore you have the opportunity to admire the work of Elly van Leeuwen, Jacqueline Petit, Helene Doornebal and Netty van Osch.

 

You are very welcome to visit this expo during openinghours.
 
Work displayed on picture by: Jacqueline Petit

Events

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11 May-31 December - Walk-App: Envisioning Indonesia

Envisioning Indonesia is an extraordinary walk-app that allows users to connect the cityscape of Leiden with similar places on the other side of the world: Indonesia. Download... more

Envisioning Indonesia is an extraordinary walk-app that allows users to connect the cityscape of Leiden with similar places on the other side of the world: Indonesia. Download the Walk-app:

 

IOS
Android

 

While walking through Leiden, short clips can be activated on a mobile device as if one looks over a distant wall. The app offers two routes. The first one focuses on the landmarks of Leiden. The textile history of Leiden will be connected to moving images of a textile factory in Delanggu on Java, and the Leidense Burcht, the fortress in the city centre, will be linked to ‘Fort Oranje’ on the Moluccan Island of Ternate. The second route focuses on daily life by showing the Indonesian version of the student dormitory, a kos, and the oldest market of Jakarta in reference to the main shopping street of Leiden. All clips come from ‘Recording the Future’, an audio-visual project of KITLV recording daily life in Indonesia. ‘Envisioning Indonesia’ enables the walker to combine the business of street life in Leiden with glimpses of Indonesia, making strolling through Leiden a global experience.

 

The Envisioning Indonesia app provides a short (4km) and a long (6km) walk and is now available online for android and IOS. Download the walk-app for IOS or download the walk-app for Android.

Thu May 11th, 2017 - Leiden streets

11 September-31 December - Leiden University Libraries welcomes Peter Frankopan as Visiting Scaliger professor

Historian Peter Frankopan has been appointed Visiting Scaliger professor at Leiden University for 2017. The holder of this chair is affiliated both to the Sca... more

Historian Peter Frankopan has been appointed Visiting Scaliger professor at Leiden University for 2017. The holder of this chair is affiliated both to the Scaliger Institute of Leiden University Libraries and to the Faculty of Humanities. Former holders of the chair include Anthony Grafton (Princeton University) and François Déroche (Collège de France). Frankopan is Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research.

 

Peter Frankopan
Dr. Peter Frankopan is a historian at the University of Oxford, where he is Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research and a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society. He works on the history of the Mediterranean, Russia, the Middle East, Persia Central Asia and beyond, and on relations between Christianity and Islam. He also specializes in medieval Greek literature. He is the author of The First Crusade: the call from the East (2012) which Times Literary Supplement called 'The most significant contribution to re-thinking the origins and causes of the First Crusade for a generation', and of The Silk Roads: A New History of the World (2016), an international bestseller, described by William Dalrymple as a ‘historical epic of dazzling range, ambition and achievement’.
 
Teaching, Research and Keynote speech
As Visiting Scaliger professor, Dr. Frankopan will stay at Leiden University in September and December 2017 and will be engaged with teaching and research. On 14 September Dr. Frankopan will deliver the keynote speech on Asia and the making of the Modern World in the Pieterskerk on the occasion of the grand opening of Leiden University’s Asian Library.
 

Scaliger Institute

The Scaliger Institute, founded in 2000,  promotes teaching and research that uses the Special Collections held at Leiden University Libraries. Since its inception the Institute has received more than 270 fellows and has organized symposia, masterclasses, and special lecture series. The Institute takes its name from Josephus Justus Scaliger (1540-1609), the best known Leiden academic in the early years of the university. Scaliger was also a patron of the University Library.

Mon September 11th, 2017 - Universiteitsbibliotheek Leiden

18 September-20 November - LAK-Course - Visual arts Chinese Calligraphy

For whom This course is open to anyone over the age of 16. No prior experience is needed in order to participate. It consists of 10 classes.   Content... more

For whom
This course is open to anyone over the age of 16. No prior experience is needed in order to participate. It consists of 10 classes.
 
Content

The oldest known annals of Chinese history were written in calligraphy. Chinese calligraphy is thus as old as the Chinese writing system. Calligraphy is an important part of China's cultural heritage and is seen as one of the most important art forms. Due to the spread of China's influence in the world, Chinese calligraphy is now part of other country's cultures as well, such as Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Vietnam. In 2009, UNESCO included Chinese calligraphy in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The tools calligraphers use, define Chine calligraphy as an art. The 'Four Treasures' of Calligraphy are: the paintbrush, ink, paper, and inkstone. With these tools, you'll gradually learn the basic techniques and rools of Chinese calligraphy, which you will use both in class and at home while practicing. Apart from being an art form, Chinese calligraphy is also a form of meditation, soothing the mind and spirit.
 
Teacher
Cara Yuan, an experienced and enthusiastic teacher, is an established Chinese calligrapher. Her work was already exhibited in China and Japan before she had reached the age of 20. Due to her vast experience in teaching Chinese calligraphy, Cara Yuan will create a comfortable atmosphere in which you can learn the ins and outs of this art. All participants will get personal assistance and the opportunity to fulfill their own wishes within this course.

Cara Yuan was born and raised in China. Her father is an artist, specialized in Chinese painting. Her grandfather was a Chinese calligrapher. In 1998, Cara moved to the Netherlands to study at the Amsterdam University of the Arts and become a teacher. She has been teaching Chinese calligraphy since 1999.
 
Registration

Please register online by visiting this link. Isn't the registration link working? Please contact the LAK via info@lakcursussen.nl or tel: 071 - 5272314 | 5272317

 

Anyone who registers for a LAK course, thereby agrees to the LAK term and conditions.

 

26 September-13 December - China Seminars

In the China Seminar/Lecture series every three weeks, Leiden University Chinese Studies invite speakers from Leiden University and elsewhere to give a presentation on their o... more

In the China Seminar/Lecture series every three weeks, Leiden University Chinese Studies invite speakers from Leiden University and elsewhere to give a presentation on their ongoing research.

 

Dates & Topics

26|09 Professor Ge Jianxiong (Fudan University)
04
|10 Jeroen de Kloet (University of Amsterdam)
18|10 
Christopher Rea (The University of British Colombia)
01
|11 Ching-Ling Wang (Rijksmuseum)
15|11 Daniel Stumm (Leiden University)
07|12 James Benn (McMaster University)
13|12 Rongdao Lai (University of Southern California)

 

Time & Place
15.15–17.00 hours,
Chinese Studies, Leiden Institute for Area Studies
Different locations in Leiden

 

 

 

 

23 October-31 December - 'Reistafel' uncovers Asia

A meal as a key to Asia. Eighty minor’s students are writing blogs about the Reistafel – a play on words in Dutch referring to travel (reis) and rice (rijst) that serves a... more

A meal as a key to Asia. Eighty minor’s students are writing blogs about the Reistafel – a play on words in Dutch referring to travel (reis) and rice (rijst) that serves as a metaphor for the political, economic, cultural and social diversity of Asia. The blog is part of the minor Journalism and New Media that trains students for a career in (cross-medial) journalism.

 

The Reistafel is the winner of a competition that was finalised early in September 2016. Other ideas put forward were about doing business in Asia, backpacking in Asia and integrating Chinese students in Leiden.

 

The Reistafel is based on an Asian meal, the rijsttafel. Students will analyse in different editorial teams all the conceivable aspects of the meal: What does it cost? What kind of diet is it? Who eats together with whom and how are they related to one another? What is the cultural-historical significance of food in different cultures?

 

The aim of the blog is to use the example of a meal to convey differences and similarities between Western and Eastern cultures and the way they influence one another. The communication will be cross-medial, featuring written articles and videos, data journalism and podcasts. Visit the blog here.

Mon October 23rd, 2017 - Journalism and New Media offices

11-19 November - Von Siebold in search of the real East Asia: musical exploration with Leiden’s Het Zingend Hart

For many centuries, East Asia has attracted western scientists like a magnet. On Deshima, peninsula off the coast near Nagasaki, the famous Leiden-based surgeon-major Philip... more

For many centuries, East Asia has attracted western scientists like a magnet. On Deshima, peninsula off the coast near Nagasaki, the famous Leiden-based surgeon-major Philipp Franz von Siebold (1796-1866) experienced the happiest years of his life. His western knowledge of medicine enabled him to cure Japanese patients. In return, he received Japanese artefacts, plants and animals. It resulted in a world-famous collection, nowadays on show in the Leiden Japan Museum SieboldHuis. Von Siebold lectured in Nagasaki, lived with a Japanese woman, was admitted to the capital Edo (forbidden territory for foreigners), and secretly produced maps of Japan. Then his luck turned. He was accused of espionage.

 

In November 2017, a colourful performance will revive Von Siebold’s story. The Leiden chamber choir Het Zingend Hart, conducted by Guido van Swieten, will vocalize and re- enact Von Siebold’s dramatic walk of life with matching Japanese, Chinese and Indonesian songs (by composers such as Osamu Shimizu and He Lüting). Some oriental texts and themes (such as Balinese kecak) will sound to music by western composers. Thus, the audience will relive Von Siebold’s history to a caleidoscope of tunes honouring the rich cultures of East Asia. From authentic folk music to striking western orientalisms.
ようこそ, Yōkoso (be welcome!)

Details

This performance will take place on:

  • Saturday 11 November 2017, 20.00 hrs
  • Sunday 12 November 2017, 15.00 hrs
  • Saturday 18 November 2017, 20.00 hrs
  • Sunday 19 November 2017, 15.00 hr

 

Venue: P.J. Veth building, which can be reached through the new main entrance on the side of the Hortus botanicus in Leiden (Rapenburg 73).

Directed by: Nicoline van de Beek, Ton van Kempen and Eva van der Weerd
Conductor: Guido van Swieten
Production: Coby van der Weerd
With Arie Pos as Philipp Franz von Siebold

In cooperation with dancing group Raiden Yosakoi and students Hiyori Suzuki, Raudya Amalia, Rani Krisnamurthi, Sangqiao Li and Her Gao.

Songs in original languages, spoken texts in Dutch.

World premiere of “Kexi”, a composition by Guido van Swieten.

Tickets

Book a seat at this event in Leiden’s Asia Year. Tickets are available through info@hetzingendhart.nl. A regular ticket can be purchased at € 15; discount tickets for children under 12 and students (student ID to be shown at the entrance) are available for € 10. A ticket includes one coffee or tea. The number of ticket is limited so do not wait too long to book your ticket!

Sat November 11th, 2017 - P.J. Veth building

23-24 November - International Symposium: Rethinking the VOC

Recently academic programs increasingly focus on the negative sides of VOC history. During this symposium experts will give an analysis of their new insights. What is the curr... more

Recently academic programs increasingly focus on the negative sides of VOC history. During this symposium experts will give an analysis of their new insights. What is the current state of research? How can this be helped forward by a non-western approach? And where will it go – or does it need to go – in the future?

 

National Archives, Leiden University and Leiden Asia Year invite you to join them at this excitatory symposium to attend a variety of lectures, discussions and a round table on various subjects seen from new perspectives.

 

Because of the digitisation of the VOC Archives, the National Archives of the Netherlands are showcasing the Dutch East India Company in 2017.During the symposium, you are welcome to visit their exhibition on the VOC too.

 

Registration

You can register for this symposium via this link.

 

Programme

To view the full programme please visit the programme-page

 

Thu November 23rd, 2017 - National Archives in The Hague

23 November - BplusC | Dr. Rogier Creemers | China: What a challenge!

About the interaction between law, governance and information technology in China and the Chinese political-legal ideology. Rogier Creemers is researcher at the Van Vollenh... more

About the interaction between law, governance and information technology in China and the Chinese political-legal ideology.

Rogier Creemers is researcher at the Van Vollenhoven Institute for Law, Management and Society, Faculty of Law at Leiden University
 

All lectures (except for lectures in Leiderdorp) take place in BplusC, Location Nieuwstraat, starting at 20.00-20.45, free admission.

Thu November 23rd, 2017 - BplusC Leiderdorp

7 December - Studium Generale | Buddhist Aspects of Health and Welness in Premodern Chinese Tea Culture

Buddhist ideas, institutions and individuals were influential in the creation of Chinese tea culture from at least the eighth century onwards. Given that tea was often promote... more

Buddhist ideas, institutions and individuals were influential in the creation of Chinese tea culture from at least the eighth century onwards. Given that tea was often promoted by Buddhists as an alternative to alcohol, and that it was extolled for its abilities to support strenuous meditation practice, were there particular Buddhist discourses of health and wellness with regard to tea drinking?
 
In this lecture, organized by Studium GeneraleHonours Academy Leidenand Humanities Lab, we will explore the surviving textual, artistic and material evidence in order to understand better some of the virtues of tea consumption from a Chinese Buddhist perspective.

 

Speaker
James A. Benn received his PhD from UCLA in 2001 and is now Professor of Buddhism and East Asian Religions at McMaster University. He studies Buddhism and Daoism in medieval China. To date, he has focused on three major areas of research: bodily practice in Chinese Religions; the ways in which people create and transmit new religious practices and doctrines; and the religious dimensions of commodity culture. He has published on self-immolation, spontaneous human combustion, Buddhist apocryphal scriptures, and tea and alcohol in medieval China in journals such as History of Religions, T’oung Pao, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies and Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies. He is the author of Burning for the Buddha: Self-immolation in Chinese Buddhism (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2007) and Tea in China: A Religious and Cultural History(University of Hawai‘i Press, 2007). He is currently working on a translation and study of the Śūramgama sutra, a Chinese Buddhist apocryphon.
 
Time: 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
 
All welcome!
Entrance is free.
No prior registration required.

Thu December 7th, 2017 - Oude Sterrewacht, Room B104

8 December - Salawat Dulang: Sinar Barapi & Kilek Barapi - Trance-like vocals and percussion from West Sumatra, Indonesia

Salawat dulang is a religious muic style from Minangkabau, an area in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Two vocalists sing a kind of sufi lyrics while at the same time beating a brass... more

Salawat dulang is a religious muic style from Minangkabau, an area in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Two vocalists sing a kind of sufi lyrics while at the same time beating a brass tray. But mostly the chanting goes beyond sufi texts, all kind of stories are being improvised by the singers. The two singers sometimes sing together, sometimes allternately, while developing a trance-like cadence by the percussion rhythms on their brass trays.

 

Salawat dulang are usually performed at weddings, circumcissions, religious and national holidays. For Minang audience, where the tradition is being practiced, they prefer salawat dulang performed alternately by two pairs, in a kind of battle. In this case, each pair would create and improvise stories. The theme depends on the occasion in which salawat dulang is being performed.

 

Also tonight two pairs of artists will play alternately, Sinar Barapi and Kilek Barapi. Salawat dulang is traditionally performed all night long, but here it will be approximately 60 minutes. 🙂

 

 

Before the performance Dr. Suryadi will give an introduction in english. Dr. Suryadi himself is from Minangkabau and works at Leiden University. He has written a lot about music from West Sumatra, and he will give the audience more cultural and musical context.

 

The music of Sinar Barapi & Kilek Barapi is also on youtube. You can listen to one of their songs by visiting Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pw5uo2UEjsg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3VQJy2kErU

 

Entrance: 15 (door) / 12.50 (pre sale, via internet only)

 
This concert is organised together with Europalia Indonesia Arts Festival.

Fri December 8th, 2017 - Qbus Muziekhuis

12 December - Film: On The Track Of Robert van Gulik

On The Track Of Robert van Gulik is a documentary quest about one of the most read Dutch writers in the world, Robert van Gulik (1910-1967). This diplomat, author and scholar... more

On The Track Of Robert van Gulik is a documentary quest about one of the most read Dutch writers in the world, Robert van Gulik (1910-1967). This diplomat, author and scholar was a highly versatile man and a connoisseur of Japanese and Chinese languages and cultures. He owes his fame to his detective fiction starring Judge Dee. The filmmaker Rob Rombout follows in his footsteps to discover the author’s legacy in his diaries, the people he inspired and the witnesses to his life. During Rombout’s years-long travels through the Netherlands, Indonesia, Japan, the U.S. and China he located many of van Gulik’s contemporaries and devotees of both Judge Dee and van Gulik: people whose lives changed after entering his universe. These are unique people who emulate the writer, the scholar and the diplomat.

 

Made possible with the kind support of the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Chinese Embassy in the Netherlands, Leiden Asia Year, The Van Gulik Family, Het Springergenootschap, DEE Projects and Filmhuis Den Haag.

Tue December 12th, 2017 - Filmhuis Den Haag

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